Monday, March 12, 2018

Go Further with Food

Get the most out of what you’re eating and reduce food waste
“You are what you eat.” We’ve all heard it, but there really is a kernel of truth there. Eating healthy can help us be healthy. There’s never a bad time to talk about healthy eating, but March is an especially good opportunity because it’s National Nutrition Month® – a time to focus on making smart food choices, establishing healthy eating habits and ensuring that we are doing what we can to reduce food waste. Did you know that it’s estimated that an average 300 pounds of food per person is thrown away each year? This year’s theme from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is “Go Further with Food” – a reminder for all of us to get the most out of what we eat while wasting the least. Here are a few simple ways you can help make your food go further.

Switch it up
They say variety is the spice of life. It’s also a key building block of healthy eating. Different foods provide different nutrients. Incorporating a variety of foods from all of the food groups into your daily diet helps ensure that your body is getting the most nutrients possible. Healthy salads and well-balanced meals are a great way to keep variety at the center.

Be thoughtful
Before you visit the grocery store, take inventory of your pantry, fridge and freezer. Check expiration dates and “best used by” dates to see what you need to consume first before buying more, and research healthy recipes that use these items. Then, fill out your grocery list with what you really need for the week.

Prepare ahead
Healthy eating is a lot easier than you might think, especially with a little preparation. Pick a morning or afternoon and prepare your healthy lunches for the week ahead. A few hours one afternoon can save you a lot of time throughout the week and keep you accountable to healthy eating habits.

Get creative
Make your food work for you. Be creative and look for ways to repurpose leftovers into brand new meals. Turn those last couple of chicken breasts and leftover roasted vegetables into a cozy stew, or mix your leftover pasta with some fresh veggies for a pasta salad for lunch the next day. You’ll be stretching your food dollar without stretching your waistline!

Ask for advice
Talk with a local nutritionist or dietitian about making your food go further. They’ll have some great ideas for healthy eating habits and choices that both fit your individual lifestyle and help cut down on food waste.

If you’d like more information on how you can help your food go further, visit, or call 540-316-2640 to schedule an appointment with a Fauquier Health Wellness Center dietitian.

Is It Time for a Colonoscopy?

Do you remember when you used to put on your favorite bell bottoms and disco dance the night away? If you do, then it’s probably time to think about a routine colonoscopy screening. According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women, excluding skin cancers. And the vast majority of these cases occur in people 50 and older. 

The good news is that the overall incidence of, and death rates associated with, colorectal cancers have been on the decline for more than a decade, thanks in large part to effective colonoscopy screenings that can detect the disease in its early stages.

What are the symptoms?
Colorectal cancer often has no symptoms in its early stages – another reason that screenings are so important. Still, you should see your doctor if you have any of these warning signs:

  • Bleeding from the rectum
  • Blood in the stool or in the toilet after a bowel movement
  • Change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool
  • Persistent cramping or discomfort in the lower abdomen
  • An urge to have a bowel movement when the bowel is empty
  • Constipation or diarrhea that lasts for more than a few days
  • Decreased appetite
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Unintentional weight loss

 While these symptoms can also be indicative of other health conditions, your doctor can help you get to the root of the issue and determine the underlying cause.

How can I help prevent it?
Colonoscopy screenings are the number one way you can reduce your risk of colorectal cancer since the screenings can help detect the disease early or find polyps before they become cancerous. While the vast majority of new cases occur at age 50 and over, the disease does not discriminate and can happen to men and women at any age.

You can also be proactive in prevention in other ways. Living a healthy lifestyle that includes daily exercise, a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy weight, limiting your alcohol intake and eliminating smoking can reduce your risk for colorectal and many other forms of cancer. Knowing your family’s medical history is also important – a history of the disease in your immediate family puts you at a higher risk for the disease.

Contact Fauquier Hospital or our physician referral line to learn more about colorectal cancer and its detection and prevention, and schedule your colonoscopy today.

What to Expect During a Colonoscopy
Colonoscopies are an easier procedure than many realize. Shortly before the procedure, you will likely be given pain medication and a sedative to minimize discomfort. During the approximately 30-minute procedure, any polyps found will be removed by the doctor and tissue samples will be sent for a biopsy. 

Keep in mind that you will be instructed to follow a special diet the day before your procedure and will need to have someone available to take you home afterward.

Friday, March 9, 2018

Fauquier Health Recognizes Nationally Certified Nurses

Fauquier Health is celebrating Certified Nurses Day on Monday, March 19 by honoring its board certified nurses. The nurses named below are being recognized for their professionalism, leadership, and commitment to excellence in patient care:

Board Certification of nurses plays an increasingly important role in the assurance of high standards of care for patients and their loved ones. Nursing -- like health care in general -- has become increasingly complex. While a registered nurse (RN) license provides entry to general nursing practice, the knowledge-intensive requirements of modern nursing require extensive education, as well as a strong personal commitment to excellence by the nurse.

Fauquier Health encourages national board certification for all its nurses. Patients are encouraged to inquire whether there are certified nurses on staff when they visit a hospital or their primary care provider. There are many nursing certification specialties such as medical-surgical, pediatric, pain management, cardiac vascular, oncology, hospice, case management, emergency nursing, critical care and many others. Many nursing certification bodies exist to serve the full range of specialized nursing care offered in the contemporary health care system; national nurse-certifying bodies should be accredited by either the Accreditation Board for Specialty Nursing Certification (ABSNC) or the National Organization for Competence Assurance (NOCA), or both.

Please join Fauquier Health and the nation’s national nursing certification organizations in honoring those hardworking, dedicated nurses for their professionalism, and a job well done!